'It's About Time': Ableism in the Academy - Seminar at the Swansea University Centre for Research into Gender, Culture and Society

By the time this is posted - all hail the glory that is the auto-scheduling tool - I will be ensconced on a train, whizzing my way to Swansea, Wales. Hello, future me! This minor-league time travel is in honour of an exceptionally kind invitation, made by an exceptionally kind academic Dr Roberta Magnani, the Director of Swansea University’s Centre for Research into Gender, Culture and Society (GENCAS). I will be - I currently am? - giving a seminar as part of the Centre’s series on intersectionality, speaking about ableism in the Academy.

All my temporal dilly-dallying with this post is eminently apt, it turns out, because my paper is all about time , or rather times plural - academic time, disability time, crip time - and temporal slippage, pasts and presents and futures all colliding. Check out my abstract for the full(er) story:

It’s about time we talked about disability in the Academy. Many, if not most, academics do not disclose their condition(s) for well-grounded fear of discrimination. Neoliberal rhetoric about “productivity” – we must always produce more, we must always be seen to be producing more – is fundamentally ableist. Ever more nominally non-disabled scholars are disabled by the “hyper-work” prescribed by the academic regime. The academic timepiece stops for no-body. And yet, those of us living with disability, we watch – we must watch – different clocks: those which show ‘crip’ time – episodic, non-linear, thickened. It is a radically different temporal orientation than hetero-patriarchal linear time. Radical is the key word here. The logic of crip time offers us a new methodology for medievalist work: a practice of empathetic and politically urgent trans-historical engagement with our sources. What’s more, recognition of time, or manipulation thereof, as a central weapon in the Academy’s dysfunctional arsenal allows for the creation of a broader collective for resistance. If the Academy disables, then let us crip it right back – decentering the neoliberalized normate in our scholarship, in our pedagogy and in our professional lives.

If you’d like to read my paper, then you’ll find most - though not all - of the material in two chapters which should be published in the near-ish future:

For a flavour of the talk itself, flick through the slides posted below at your leisure. Forget the content, if you like clocks (and watches and venerable timepieces), you will love this deck. And just below that, you can (now) scroll through tweets posted about the talk by myself, and attendees. Check out @RobertaDMagnani’s thread in particular for a summary of my key points.

Edited 19/03/19 to embed the Wakelet and relevant text.

CfP: Sponsored Panel on Disability & Sanctity at International Medieval Congress, Leeds (UK), 2018

With apologies for cross-posting! Please feel free to share this CfP with all relevant parties.

 

Panel title: "Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Non-Normative Bodies"

Sponsored by: Hagiography Society

Conference: International Medieval Congress, Leeds (UK), 2-5 July 2018

 

In her 2006 monograph Disability in Medieval Europe, Irina Metzler conducted the first in-depth analyses of medieval miracle narratives in the context of disability studies. This ground-breaking work demonstrated the ways in which such an approach productively expands – and complicates – out understanding of medieval impairment and medieval hagiography alike. This panel seeks to harness the methodological vigour of Metzler’s intervention, and move the discussion forward to reap the benefits of the efflorescence in medieval disability studies that has taken place since 2006. What can frameworks from disability studies add to studies of medieval holiness, and vice versa? What happens when we sanctify the crip, and crip the sacred?

gwen - 'St. Roch's, various plaster feet'. Via  Flickr . License:  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 .  Plaster feet hung on a wall, left as devotional offerings by supplicants in search of miraculous cures, in the St Roch (d. 1327) chapel and shrine in New Orleans (Louisiana, USA).

gwen - 'St. Roch's, various plaster feet'. Via Flickr. License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Plaster feet hung on a wall, left as devotional offerings by supplicants in search of miraculous cures, in the St Roch (d. 1327) chapel and shrine in New Orleans (Louisiana, USA).

A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings, to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation.

What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

 

 

If you’re interested in speaking on this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words, and a brief bio to the panel organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk), by 25 August 2017. Please also stipulate your audio-visual requirements in your submission (e.g. projector, speakers, and so forth).

 

N.B. Conference regulations stipulate that speakers may only present on one panel each year at Leeds. As such, we cannot consider papers from individuals who have already submitted abstract proposals to other sessions at the conference.

 

[Updated 08/08/17 to reflect extended deadline for submission.]